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COVID, Social Distancing, and Mask Books for Young Children

COVID Books

 

With everything going on surrounding COVID-19, it is highly recommended that adults talk to and have conversations with children about the disease, and all of today’s current procedures.  We have put together a list of books that talk about COVID, Social Distancing, and Masks that are geared towards young children.  Adults can play an important role in helping children make sense of what they hear in a way that is honest, accurate, and minimizes anxiety or fear — through books!

 

COVID/Coronavirus Books:

 


Social Distancing Books:

 


Mask Books:

 

 


Tips for talking to children (From CDC Website)

  • Remain calm. Remember that children will react to both what you say and how you say it. They will pick up cues from the conversations you have with them and with others.
  • Reassure children that they are safe. Let them know it is okay if they feel upset. Share with them how you deal with your own stress so that they can learn how to cope from you.
  • Make yourself available to listen and to talk. Let children know they can come to you when they have questions.
  • Avoid language that might blame others and lead to stigma.
  • Pay attention to what children see or hear on television, radio, or online. Consider reducing the amount of screen time focused on COVID-19. Too much information on one topic can lead to anxiety.
  • Provide information that is truthful and appropriate for the age and developmental level of the child. Talk to children about how some stories on COVID-19 on the Internet and social media may be based on rumors and inaccurate information. Children may misinterpret what they hear and can be frightened about something they do not understand.
  • Teach children everyday actions to reduce the spread of germs. Remind children to wash their hands frequently and stay away from people who are coughing or sneezing or sick. Also, remind them to cough or sneeze into a tissue or their elbow, then throw the tissue into the trash.
  • If school is open, discuss any new actions that may be taken at school to help protect children and school staff.

20 Books about Diversity and Race for Preschoolers

Books Diversity Race Preschoolers

 

Talking to young children about diversity and race is necessary.  A baby’s brain can notice race-based differences from as young as 6 months, according to the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP), and by ages 2 to 4, children can internalize racial bias.  Child care educators have an important role to play in fostering young children’s positive racial identities, so here are some great books that will help.

 

20 Books about Diversity and Race for Preschoolers:

 

 


Talking Race With Young Children

(from NPR.org)

 

Even babies notice differences like skin color, eye shape and hair texture. Here’s how to handle conversations about race, racism, diversity and inclusion, even with very young children.

 

A few things to remember:

  • Don’t shush or shut them down if they mention race.
  • Don’t wait for kids to bring it up.
  • Be proactive, helping them build a positive awareness of diversity.
  • When a child experiences prejudice, grown-ups need to both address the feelings and fight the prejudices.
  • You don’t have to avoid topics like slavery or the Holocaust. Instead, give the facts and focus on resistance and allies.

 

In addition to Jeanette Betancourt, senior vice president for Social Impact at Sesame Workshop, we spoke to Beverly Daniel Tatum: We recommend her TEDx talk as well as her book, Why Are All the Black Kids Sitting Together in the Cafeteria?: And Other Conversations About Race.

 

Additional Resources:

  • Babies begin to notice race at 6 months old — in fact, according to this pair of studies by Professor Kang Lee at the University of Toronto, they actually show signs of racial bias by this age.
  • One in 10 children is multiracial — according to Pew Research Center. This includes children with parents of two different races, plus those with at least one multiracial parent.

15 Books about Germs for Preschool

Books about Germs

 

Talking to children about how germs spread and the importance of handwashing can be a difficult subject.  We found several books about germs geared towards preschool children that can help you.

 

15 Books about Germs for Preschool:

 

 

 


Try one of these fun, interactive activities to teach children about germs and how to stop them from spreading.  (Source: Care.com)

1. Glitter GermsIn this activity from the Columbus Public Health website, sprinkle a little glitter on your child’s hands. Then have them wash with just water. Repeat the experiment, washing with soap and water the second time. Have your child observe which method removes more glitter. You can also put glitter on your hand and touch your child’s shoulder, hands and hair. Show them how the glitter (like germs) can spread by touch.

 

2. Everything You TouchThis activity, also from Columbus Public Health, has children make and color their own germs and then tape them to anything they touch to see how widely germs spread by touch.

 

3. Connect the DotsCheck out these lesson plans and activities at the website of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC).

 

4.  Happy Handwashing SongTeach your kids this simple song from the CDC. Sing it twice through to reach the recommended time for handwashing.

 

5. Scrub ClubGo online and check out the songs and activities from NSF International.

 

6. Germs! VideoLet kids learn about germs along with Sid the Science Kid and his parents in this short, animated video.

 

7. “Wash, Wash, Wash Your Hands” SongWash hands along with Little John in this sing-a-long video from Little Angel.

25 Books about Polar Bears for Preschool

25 books about polar bears for preschool

Polar bears and winter animals should be included in a preschool curriculum during January and February.   We have found 25 books about polar bears for preschool children that can be incorporated into your early childhood program.

 

25 Books about Polar Bears for Preschool:


Ten polar bear facts from National Geographic Kids

1) Polar bears are found in the frozen wilds of the Arctic, in Canada, Alaska (US), Greenland, Russia and Norway.

2) These are seriously big bears, gang. Adult polar bears can measure over 2.5m long and weigh around 680kg. Their huge size and weight make them the largest living carnivores (meat eaters) on Earth!

3) Polar bears are well adapted to survive in one of the harshest environments on our planet. As well as their thick fur, they have a layer of fat, called blubber, that insulates (protects) their bodies from the frosty air and near-freezing water. Polar bears also have black skin under their glistening coat, which helps them soak up the Sun’s rays and keep warm.

4) These magnificent mammals have an incredible sense of smell which they use to track their favourite grub, seals*. In fact, their sense of smell is so good, they can sniff out prey from up to 16km away!

5) Despite their size and bulk, polar bears are excellent swimmers, and have been spotted in waters over 100km offshore. They can comfortably swim at around 10km/h using their slightly webbed, 30cm wide paws like paddles in the water.

6) Although good swimmers, polar bears aren’t quick enough to reliably catch seals in open water. Instead, they depend on the ice as a hunting platform. They wait near seal breathing holes or at the ice’s edge for a seal to surface. They then snatch if from the sea and…gulp!

7) Did you know that a polar bear’s fur isn’t white? It’s actually transparent with a hollow core that reflects light. This helps the bears blend in with their surroundings – a useful trick, especially when hunting wary seals!

8) Female polar bears give birth to their cubs in snow dens (in November or December), where the family is protected from the harsh Arctic environment. At birth, the cubs are only around 30cm long and weigh around half a kilogram – that’s about the same as a guinea pig!

9) The polar family emerge from the den four to five months later. The cubs will stay with their mother for about two years, during which time they learn the skills needed to survive in the Arctic.

10) Sadly, these incredible creatures are classified as “vulnerable”. The biggest threat to polar bears is climate change. Rising global temperatures means that sea ice is melting earlier and forming later each year, leaving polar bears less time to hunt for food.

Favorite November Books for Preschoolers

November books

November is filled with excitement with Election Day, Veteran’s Day, and Thanksgiving. There are plenty of opportunities to read to children, so here are some favorite November books for preschoolers:

Election Day Books:

Veteran’s Day Books:

Thanksgiving Books:


There is also the book, In November.

Description: In November, the air grows cold and the earth and all of its creatures prepare for winter. Animals seek food and shelter. And people gather together to celebrate their blessings with family and friends.

Cynthia Rylant’s lyrical language and Jill Kastner’s rich, cozy paintings capture the cherished moments of this autumn month–the moments we spend together and the ones we witness in the world around us.

Be sure to check out other our other posts:

25 Books about Picnics for Preschool

25 books about picnics for preschool

Picnics are popular in the summer months and it is something that can be included in a preschool curriculum.   We have found 25 books about picnics for preschool children that can be incorporated into your early childhood program.  Keep in mind that picnics can be just as fun indoors on a rainy day.

25 Books about Picnics for Preschool:


Top 10 Health Benefits of Going on a Picnic (Good for children and adults)

  • Outdoors Spending time outdoors, basking in nature, breathing fresh air and enjoying a great view. The pure air invigorates you and leaves you feeling rejuvenated. For those with respiratory disorders, breathing clean air helps clear the lungs.
  • Family bonding Spending time with family is always a great bonding experience. In the fast-paced, urbane lifestyle of today there is often limited time for maintaining relationships with some of the most important people in your life. Staying engaged with your family and friends can help build stronger bonds and foster warmth, security and love, as well as feelings of belonging.
  • Enables communication Since picnics often take place in warm environments, the tendency to participate in relaxing small talk is high. Simply keeping updated on what is going on in other people’s lives and learning what their plans can improve relationships. Conversations during the meal provide opportunities for the party to bond, plan, connect and learn from one another.
  • Grants time for self-reflection While picnics offer many social benefits, you don’t have to spend the entire time chatting up a storm. Picnics offer an excellent opportunity for you to spend time meditating about your life, the decisions you have made and the decisions you will make.
  • Foster healthy eating habits – Meals prepared and eaten at home are usually more nutritious and healthy than eating out and particularly so for when you bring food for a picnic. The typical portrait of picnics present a wicker basket full of fruitsvegetables, dairy and grains. These foods provide nutrients such as fiber, calcium and essential vitamins.
  • Stay active – Regular picnics can foster a family ritual where young ones are introduced to sports, games, and nature and encourages adults to partake in physical activities as well. Mini games between family and friends like tug-of-war, 2-hand-touch or flag football and kickball can be played before a meal to help induce a feeling of achievement prior to a well-deserved meal, while playing more casual games like horseshoes and bean bag toss can serve as a relaxing but still active activity. Even consuming the healthy food usually provided at picnics keeps you energetic and active through the day.
  • Mood booster – Eating lunch outdoors is a natural mood booster. You can be amazed how much the lack of sun in your body can affect you mood. There’s something about fresh air, sunshine, or a nice breeze that just puts you in good mood and motivates you making you want to get some exercise.
  • Relieves stress – Picnics are a great stress buster as it helps reduce the stress and anxiety related to work and home. Being an adult isn’t always easy and it’s great to be able to ease up on the responsibility from time to time by lounging in the sunlight.
  • Builds stronger bones – The vitamin D we get from the sun is needed for maximum absorption of calcium from the intestine, which helps build strong bones and teeth. Getting enough vitamin D can help you reduce your chances of getting bone deterioration diseases like osteoporosis. For children, regular sun exposure helps increase the process of growth and height and can decrease the risk of rickets. The sun also provides benefits to your skin by providing a nice, warm, sun-kissed glow.
  • Saves money – Picnics are known to be quite inexpressive. All one has to do is prepare meals at home and head out to a park or picnic area. If you have a well-stocked refrigerator and pantry, you may not even have to spend a cent!

Snowmen Books for Children

Snowmen Books for Children

Snowmen Books for Children:  Winter time is a wonderful time to involve snowmen in your child care program.   Snowmen themes and activities are great fun for young children.  We found a collection of some of the best snowmen books for children.  These books are appropriate for children ages 1-6, and they can make a great addition to your classroom library.


Some additional snowmen resources include:


Facts About Snowmen (source):

Now that the snowy season is upon many parts of the world, it is likely that thousands of children will make an effort to build snowmen (and snowwomen) as soon as the first frost is on the ground.

Most snowmen consist of three balls of snow stacked up on top of each other—representing the feet, stomach and face of a snowperson. The face of a snowman is usually ornately decorated with coal or stones serving as a mouth and eyes and a carrot for a nose. Some people even go as far as to give a snowman additional accessories such as stick arms, buttons, gloves, a hat and a scarf, etc.

Although many people enjoy building snowmen, there are many little known facts about the history of these wintery creations.

The first documented snowman dates to the year 1380! That ancient snowman appears as a marginal illustration in the “Book of Hours,” a Christian devotional book that was discovered in the Netherlands. Since then snowmen have become iconic in societies that experience snowfalls. Snowmen are the center of numerous illustrations, fables and even songs. For example, “Frosty the Snowman” is a song that was recorded in 1950 and centers on the adventures of a snowman and the children who built him. Until this day, the song is hugely popular especially around Christmas.

Snowmen have also become the center of competitions such as those to see who can create the most unique snowperson (or snow creature). The world’s tallest snowman ever built was in Bethel, Maine, in 2008. She was named “Olympia” and she stood at 122 feet tall! This giant snowwoman had skis for eyelashes, tires for buttons, and arms made out of pine trees!