724.400.5065 (Monday - Friday 10AM-4PM EST)info@theearlychildhoodacademy.com
 

Summer Writing Prompts for Preschool

Summer Writing Prompts for Preschool

Writing Prompts are a great addition to a literacy center.  Journal writing in preschool can be a good way to help children develop communication skills.  They can practice phonetic spelling and creative thinking.

Here are some good Summer writing prompts for preschoolers:

  • The best part about summer is…
  • When the sun is out, I like to…
  • This is how to build a sandcastle…
  • TThe place where I want to go on vacation is…
  • When I go swimming, I like to…
  • If I were a ladybug, I would…
  • I cool down in the summer by…
  • I have a magical beach umbrella that…
  • I know it is summer when…
  • One day I bounced a beach ball so high that…

To download these writing prompt templates, as well as 10 others, visit Teachers Pay Teachers.


What are the building blocks necessary to develop writing readiness (pre-writing)? [Excerpt from Writing Readiness (Pre-Writing) Skills]

  • Hand and finger strength: An ability to exert force against resistance using the hands and fingers that allows the necessary muscle power for controlled movement of the pencil.
  • Crossing the mid-line: The ability to cross the imaginary line running from a person’s nose to pelvis that divides the body into left and right sides.
  • Pencil grasp: The efficiency of how the pencil is held, allowing age appropriate pencil movement generation.
  • Hand eye coordination: The ability to process information received from the eyes to control, guide and direct the hands in the performance of a task such as handwriting.
  • Bilateral integration: Using two hands together with one hand leading (e.g. holding and moving the pencil with the dominant hand while the other hand helps by holding the writing paper).
  • Upper body strength: The strength and stability provided by the shoulder to allow controlled hand movement for good pencil control.
  • Object manipulation: The ability to skilfully manipulate tools (including holding and moving pencils and scissors) and controlled use of everyday tools (such as a toothbrush, hairbrush, cutlery).
  • Visual perception: The brain’s ability to interpret and make sense of visual images seen by the eyes, such as letters and numbers.
  • Hand dominance: The consistent use of one (usually the same) hand for task performance, which allows refined skills to develop.
  • Hand division: Using just the thumb, index and middle finger for manipulation, leaving the fourth and little finger tucked into the palm stabilizing the other fingers but not participating.

The Incredible “I” Message

I Messages

Communication with children is important, especially when conveying what you want them to do or need them to do.  The incredible “I” message is a very effective way to communicate with children.

Introduced in the 1970’s, “I” messages are basically a way of expressing our thoughts and emotions, using a soft voice and a statement that often begins with, “I feel…” Other examples include: “I’m upset because…” “I get angry because…” “I am excited that…”

When we use “I” messages with young children, we introduce a new viewpoint to the young child.   “I” messages personalize our communication and allow adults to share their feelings with the child in a positive manner.

For an undesirable behavior, “I” messages are a better way to talk to children in a positive way, rather than using negativity.  For example, you see a child throwing sand.  Your first inclination might be to say “Stop throwing that sand!”   Instead, try an “I” message in one of two ways:

  1. Tell the child what you WANT them to do, rather than what you want them NOT to do
  2. Share your feelings with the child about what they are doing and include a reason you feel that way

Some examples include:

Unwanted Behavior: “I” Message option 1: “I” Message option 2:
Not cleaning up for lunch I would like you to put away the toys now. I feel angry that you are still playing with the toys, because other children are hungry and waiting for lunch.
Throwing sand I need for you to keep the sand in the sandbox. It scares me when I see you throwing sand, because it can get into other children’s eyes and hurt them.
Knocking down another child’s block tower I want you to help Billy rebuild the tower. When you knock down Billy’s tower, it makes me sad because he worked really hard to build it.
Keeps getting up from mat at nap time I need you to stay on your mat. I am feeling upset that you are getting up from your mat because it is quiet time and some children are trying to sleep.

(From The Magical I-Message)

This formula isn’t really magical, but something about the “I” message appeals to a child’s better self. An “I” message is a tool for teaching children how to express feelings effectively and accurately; you are role modeling the ability to connect feelings with behavior. It is also a tool for showing trust for a child’s ability to change her own behavior. In addition, the “I” message builds on the child’s need to be accepted by those adults with whom she has a caring relationship.

Children react in different ways to “I” messages. If a child is exposed to strict, authoritarian discipline at home, an “I” message may not be forceful enough to inspire change. On the other hand, if his parents are very permissive, his sense of empathy or responsibility may not be developed enough to motivate a response.

State your “I” message in a positive, neutral voice while making eye contact, and with a sense of expectation. If the child is in danger or destroying something, remove her physically from the situation as you talk. Otherwise, give her time to respond appropriately. If you “I” message doesn’t bring change the first time, restate it more firmly.